Legal Protection of Sexual Minorities in International Criminal Law


https://doi.org/10.17589/2309-8678-2018-6-1-28-57

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Abstract

For a long time, the issues of sexual orientation and gender identity have been restrained from entering the legal arena as being regarded as too radical. In today’s society, these issues warrant consideration in the context of international criminal law. Critically reflecting on the way of placing these grounds within the international criminal law framework, this paper tries to unpack the sheer possibility of addressing them within the core international crimes. Correctly defining terms such as “sexual orientation” and “gender” is not only germane, but also necessary for international criminal law to tackle them accordingly. By doing so, the power of legal argumentation in international criminal law for protecting sexual minorities is strengthened, but its boundaries and vulnerabilities are also exposed. This paper proposes that the described massive violation of the most fundamental human rights should be legally qualified as persecution. For protecting sexual minorities on an international criminal law scale, it is argued that we are not really “there” yet, but we might just be on the right track.


About the Authors

Nevenka Đurić
Washington College of Law, American University
United States

LL.M. Candidate in International Human Rights, Gender and International Law

3450 38th St. NW Apt. F408, Washington, DC, 20016

 



Sunčana Roksandić Vidlička
University of Zagreb
Croatia

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law, Department of Criminal Law

14  Sq., Zagreb, 10000



Gleb Bogush
Lomonosov Moscow State University
Russian Federation

Associate Professor, Faculty of Law

1 Leninskie Gory, Bldg. 13–14, GSP-1, Moscow, 119991



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Supplementary files

For citation: Đurić N., Roksandić Vidlička S., Bogush G. Legal Protection of Sexual Minorities in International Criminal Law. Russian Law Journal. 2018;6(1):28-57. https://doi.org/10.17589/2309-8678-2018-6-1-28-57

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