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THE CASE OF THE CITY OF SEVAS TOPOL: DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL LAW

https://doi.org/10.17589/2309-8678-2017-5-3-69-85

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Abstract

This article deals with an issue which went largely unremarked at the time – the role of the city of Sevastopol in Crimea’s declaration of independence. The Declaration of Independence of the Republic of Crimea was a joint resolution adopted by the Supreme Council of Crimea and the City Council of Sevastopol. One may state that the city of Sevastopol declared its independence as an entity possessing an international identity. Initially, only States were treated as recognized subjects of international law. But now other kinds of actors also share this recognition. However, from the point of view of classical international law, cities have no legal identity in international law and they are not granted the status of subjects of international law. The legal activities of cities on the international stage results in the need for a new approach to the treatment of cities under international law. The author has examined the legality of Sevastopol’s action in the light of both domestic and international laws. An analysis of the status of Sevastopol in Ukrainian law, as well in Soviet law is also included in this article. The author presents examples of actions of cities on the international scene which might prove that cities could be treated as non-state actors. However, the conclusion states that it remains questionable whether the city has truly acquired the status of being a subject of public international law. It is doubtful that the case of Sevastopol will contribute to the development of doctrine of non-state actors.

About the Author

NATALIA CWICINSKAJA
Adam Mickiewicz University
Poland

Assistant Professor, Chair of International Law and International Organizations, Faculty of Law and Administration, Adam Mickiewicz University

90 ul. Swiety Marcin, room 206, Poznan, 61-809, Poland



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For citation:


CWICINSKAJA N. THE CASE OF THE CITY OF SEVAS TOPOL: DOMESTIC AND INTERNATIONAL LAW. Russian Law Journal. 2017;5(3):69-85. https://doi.org/10.17589/2309-8678-2017-5-3-69-85

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ISSN 2309-8678 (Print)
ISSN 2312-3605 (Online)