The Military Use of Children by the Syrian-Iraqi Salafi-Jihadist Group


https://doi.org/10.17589/2309-8678-2017-5-1-79-97

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Abstract

Non-state armed groups are the main threats to states’ national security in the 21st century, to defend against which, states require useful methods. Recently, use of children by these groups, especially in the Middle East, has turned into one of the most important discussable issues that need to be evaluated in the context of the law of armed conflict. This study aims to discuss legal regime of the military use of children in armed conflict. The main purpose of the study is to analyze the use of child soldiers by the Syrian-Iraqi Salafi-Jihadist Group in its combat operations. In this respect, initially, the legal definition of child soldiers and the role of them in armed conflicts will be discussed. Based on this, different forms of the child soldiers’ involvement in armed conflicts and the international criminal responsibility for their war crimes will be examined as an applicable law in the context of international criminal law.

About the Author

Saeed Bagheri
Akdeniz University
Turkey

Assistant Professor of Public International Law, Faculty of Law

Dumlupinar Boulevard, Campus, Antalya, 07058, Turkey



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Supplementary files

For citation: Bagheri S. The Military Use of Children by the Syrian-Iraqi Salafi-Jihadist Group. Russian Law Journal. 2017;5(1):79-97. https://doi.org/10.17589/2309-8678-2017-5-1-79-97

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