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Socialist Constitutional Legacies

https://doi.org/10.17589/2309-8678-2021-9-2-8-25

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Abstract

With the end of the Cold War, many assumed that socialism, together with the specific constitutional values and political structures was dead (or dying). This article will challenge these assumptions. Post-Cold War reality did not, however, follow these assumptions. Some countries, especially in Asia, continue to adhere to socialist constitutional approaches. Some cannot fully overcome their socialist legacy. And still others include socialist values in their constitutions and practice. These values and ideas warrant study. Most notably, socialism carries with it a certain set of values and, consequently, a corresponding pressure on legal institutions. The authors, guest editors of this special issue of the Russian Law Journal on the socialist legacies in the world constitutions, outline a general approach for the study of socialist constitutional legacies. The article therefore addresses (a) the methodology of socialist constitutional legacies analysis, (b) the core values of the socialist constitutions and (c) ways in which socialist constitutional ideas and concepts can be combined with the principles of constitutionalism. This analysis raises a number of important – but under-researched questions. One is the extent to which these socialist ideas or concepts are actually socialist. Another is the extent to which these ideas can be included in constitutional discourse.

About the Authors

Sergei Belov
Saint Petersburg State University
Russian Federation

Sergei Belov – dean, Law Faculty

7 22nd Line V.O., Saint Petersburg, 199026



William Partlett
University of Melbourne
Australia

William Partlett – associate Professor, Melbourne Law School

185 Pelham St., Carlton, Victoria, 3065



Alexandra Troitskaya
Lomonosov Moscow State University
Russian Federation

Alexandra Troitskaya – associate Professor, Law Faculty

1, Bldg. 13-14 Leninskie Gory, Moscow, 119991



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For citation:


Belov S., Partlett W., Troitskaya A. Socialist Constitutional Legacies. Russian Law Journal. 2021;9(2):8-25. https://doi.org/10.17589/2309-8678-2021-9-2-8-25

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ISSN 2309-8678 (Print)
ISSN 2312-3605 (Online)